Christine Cox

Posts tagged ‘Greek’

6th Century: Chinese Characters in Japan

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)

By the 6th century – Chinese characters introduced to Japan by Buddhists.

From Wikipedia: “The Japanese language had no written form at the time Chinese characters were introduced, and texts were written and read only in Chinese. Later, during the Heian period (794–1185), however, a system known as kanbun emerged, which involved using Chinese text with diacritical marks to allow Japanese speakers to restructure and read Chinese sentences, by changing word order and adding particles and verb endings, in accordance with the rules of Japanese grammar.”

This is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See The Muse for the rest of the series.

 

 

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Bookbinding, Metalsmithing and Glass
We have the tools and supplies you need for your projects and classes
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4th Century: Codex Sinaiticus

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)

sinaiticus

4th century – One of the oldest known versions of a complete New Testament: Codex Sinaiticus. This is the earliest known use of iron-gall ink, which fades to brown over time – a mixture of tannin from nut galls and iron sulfate – sometimes carbon black was added for a dense black ink. Written in Greek Uncial in scriptio continua (no separations between words) in 4 columns on parchment. The main text hand is ~4mm high. It is no longer in its binding and is distributed over 4 institutions.

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

4th Century: Official Script of the Christian Church

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)

4th century – Latin is the official language of the Christian church in Rome. Uncial is the official script (though it had no official name until the 18th c.). It developed from late Majuscule (old Roman cursive). Uncial was in use until tapering off in the 10th c. – used to write Greek, Latin and Gothic

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

2nd Century: And the Prize for Most Writing in the World Goes to . . .

Bookbinding, Miniatures, Writing and Paper
(Timeline project)

In the 2nd century, the greatest amount of writing in the world (Latin and Greek) was done in Egypt.

This post is part of an ongoing series on bookbinding, miniatures, writing and paper since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

2nd Century – Nag Hammadi

Bookbinding, Miniatures, Paper and Writing

100 – 199 CE (2nd century) — Nag Hammadi codices written on papyrus – Gnostic treatises written in Coptic, probably translated from Greek

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