Christine Cox

Posts tagged ‘books’

6th Century: Biblioteca Capitolare

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports (Timeline Project)

Early 6th Century – The Biblioteca Capitolare is one of the world’s oldest libraries, established as a writing workshop for the cathedral. Probably the oldest European library still in existence. (Verona, Italy)

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

Sponsored by:

Volcano Arts

www.volcanoarts.com

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6th Century: Garima Gospels

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)Garima-gospel

~530 – Garima Gospels include some of the earliest Christian book paintings (Aksum, Ethiopia)

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

Sponsored by:

Volcano Arts

Bookbinding, Metalsmithing and Glass
We have the tools and supplies you need for your projects and classes

Before the Codex: Bamboo Slips and Accordion Folds

Before the Codex, part 5
By Christine Cox

This is the last in a five-part series focusing on various writing supports, book forms and writing styles before the codex was invented.

Presented in this graphic and the others in the series are some of the writing supports and forms that preceded the codex. They’ve survived the ravages of time, war and tradition to come down to us.
(Click graphic to enlarge)

beforecodex-pg5

Sponsored by:

Bookbinding, Metalsmithing and Glass
We have the tools and supplies you need for your projects and classes
www.volcanoarts.com

Before the Codex: Mayan “Codex” and Palm Leaf Books

Before the Codex, part 4
By Christine Cox

This is the fourth in a five-part series focusing on various writing supports, book forms and writing styles before the codex was invented.

Presented in this graphic and the others in the series are some of the writing supports and forms that preceded the codex. They’ve survived the ravages of time, war and tradition to come down to us.
(Click graphic to enlarge)

Sponsored by:

Bookbinding, Metalsmithing and Glass
We have the tools and supplies you need for your projects and classes
www.volcanoarts.com

Before the Codex: Clay Tablets

Before the Codex, part 2
By Christine Cox

This is the second in a five-part series focusing on various writing supports, book forms and writing styles before the codex was invented.

Presented in this graphic and those that will follow are some of the writing supports and forms that preceded the codex. They’ve survived the ravages of time, war and tradition to come down to us.
(Click graphic to enlarge)

beforecodex-pg2

Sponsored by:

Bookbinding, Metalsmithing and Glass
We have the tools and supplies you need for your projects and classes
www.volcanoarts.com

Hint from a Book Artist: Board Sizes and Unsupported Stitches

saggingspine_sm

The book on the left has pages and boards aligned at the tail edge. The book on the right doesn’t, and therefore sags.

Hint from a Book Artist:
Board Sizes and Unsupported Stitches
By Christine Cox

“Coptic” and other link stitches are easy to sew, flexible, beautiful, strong, historic and the fact that you can incorporate the board attachment into the sewing makes them a logical choice for a lot of projects. Because these stitches are not sewn over tapes or cords they are called “unsupported,” meaning that the spine will naturally move fairly freely over time.

Because the stitch is so beautiful, book artists often choose to leave it exposed at the spine, which reinforces this weakness from the unsupported sewing.

When a book that hasn’t been rounded and backed sits on a shelf for years, it sags. The weight of the paper pulls the book block down, making the thread stretch. Sooner or later, the book block will sit down on the shelf and the formerly straight line of sewing will curve down in the middle (see photo). In addition to being unsightly, the stretched out thread loosens up the book even more.

Gravity at work makes unsupported stitches an iffy choice for books you’ll want to keep for a long time, but sometimes artists make compromises in the name of art, and not all books are meant to last forever.

Keeping in mind that unsupported link stitches were abandoned historically for a reason, the secret to preventing the sag is to make the boards and the book block almost flush at the tail (bottom) of the book. In other words, the boards are the same height as the book block, plus the normal square (the measurement from the edge of the book block to the edge of the board) at the head, plus a smidge extra (maybe about 1/16″, depending on the size of the book) at the tail. Don’t make the boards and block completely flush because any misalignment in folding the paper or sewing the sections will stick out beyond the board edge.

The squares at the head and fore-edge will still match, so nothing will look odd.

To recap, the fore-edge and head will have squares. The tail will be almost, but not quite flush with the boards.

This tiny, 1/16″ adjustment in the relationship between the sizes of your boards and paper will make your book weather the years looking better and staying a little tighter.

saggingspine

The book on the left has pages and boards aligned at the tail edge. The book on the right doesn’t, and therefore sags.

Sponsored by Volcano Arts
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5th Century: Oldest Surviving Biblical Manuscript

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)

5th c – Oldest surviving biblical manuscript; first editions of Christian Bible Quedlinburg Italia – Fragments of 6 folios from a large illuminated manuscript of an Old Latin translation of the Christian Bible (probably produced in Rome in 420s or 430s).  Pieces were reused in bindings of other books bound in 1618 in Quedlinburg, Germany. Uncial script.

quedlinburgitalafolio2rillus1kingschap15

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

2016vaexclamation300

Bookbinding, Metalsmithing and Glass
We have the tools and supplies you need for your projects and classes
www.volcanoarts.com

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