Christine Cox

Posts tagged ‘4th century’

4th Century: Bamboo Slips to Paper in China

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)

By the 4th c – Paper has replaced bamboo and wooden slips as writing support in China

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

Advertisements

4th Century: First Signed Illuminations

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)

Year 354—First illumination work with known artist name: Roman calendar now called Chronography of 354 — Furius Dionysius Filocalus wrote the titles.

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

 

4th Century: Latin Vulgate Translation

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)


Malmesbury Bible

382 to 404 – Latin Vulgate Christian Bible translation (from Greek to Latin) commissioned by Pope Damasus I (both testaments). Translated and written by Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus (St. Jerome). Written in Uncial script. (This version was used for over 1,000 years and was the Bible of the Dark Ages)

There’s an excellent article on the Latin Vulgate in Wikipedia

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

(photo by Adrian Pingstone) Licensed under Public Domain via Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bible.malmesbury.arp.jpg#/media/File:Bible.malmesbury.arp.jpg

4th Century: Making Paper in Korea

Books, Miniatures, Paper and Writing Timeline Project
4th Century: Making Paper in Korea

The secrets of papermaking are moving along the Silk Road from China and into Korea, where the paper is now called Hanji.

From Wikipedia:

Hangul 한지
Hanja 韓紙
Revised Romanization hanji
McCune–Reischauer hanji

Wikipedia has an excellent article on the history of Korean papermaking.

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

4th Century: The Romans Are Out

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)

Trajan's Column Inscription

By the 4th century—Roman Rustic and Roman Square Capital scripts were only used for manuscript titles. As yet unnamed uncial was primary text script.

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

4th Century: Codex Sinaiticus

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)

sinaiticus

4th century – One of the oldest known versions of a complete New Testament: Codex Sinaiticus. This is the earliest known use of iron-gall ink, which fades to brown over time – a mixture of tannin from nut galls and iron sulfate – sometimes carbon black was added for a dense black ink. Written in Greek Uncial in scriptio continua (no separations between words) in 4 columns on parchment. The main text hand is ~4mm high. It is no longer in its binding and is distributed over 4 institutions.

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

4th Century: Official Script of the Christian Church

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)

4th century – Latin is the official language of the Christian church in Rome. Uncial is the official script (though it had no official name until the 18th c.). It developed from late Majuscule (old Roman cursive). Uncial was in use until tapering off in the 10th c. – used to write Greek, Latin and Gothic

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

Tag Cloud