Christine Cox

Before the Codex, part 2
By Christine Cox

This is the second in a five-part series focusing on various writing supports, book forms and writing styles before the codex was invented.

Presented in this graphic and those that will follow are some of the writing supports and forms that preceded the codex. They’ve survived the ravages of time, war and tradition to come down to us.
(Click graphic to enlarge)

beforecodex-pg2

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Bookbinding, Metalsmithing and Glass
We have the tools and supplies you need for your projects and classes
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Before the Codex, part 1
By Christine Cox

This is the first in a five-part series focusing on various writing supports, book forms and writing styles before the codex was invented. From some time around 3100 BCE, humans have recorded important details about our lives, but it wasn’t until those clever Egyptians decided to fold papyrus in half, nest the folios and sew them together that the codex form was born in about the 1st century CE.

Presented in this graphic and those that will follow are some of the writing supports and forms that preceded the codex. They’ve survived the ravages of time, war and tradition to come down to us.
(Click graphic to enlarge)

Sponsored by:

Bookbinding, Metalsmithing and Glass
We have the tools and supplies you need for your projects and classes
www.volcanoarts.com

California Native Plants in Cloisonné
By Christine Cox

Recently, I finished these 4 kiln-fired cloisonné pieces, which are a little over an inch square each. They are made from sterling silver, fine silver and enamels, which are glass ground with different minerals for color. Each was fired repeatedly in a kiln at almost 1500°. It’s an exacting and exciting process with beautiful results.

The oldest cloisonné enamels — where extremely thin wires are used to make the shapes — are from the Middle East in the 2nd century BCE. From there the technique spread to the Byzantine Empire and to Russia. Spreading along the Silk Road, it found its way to China, Japan and beyond.

My pieces are destined to become bezel-set corners on a leather-covered wooden book which will house the letters of a California miner. He mined in and around our area of the California foothills and sent letters home for 3 years. The cloisonné pieces are in celebration of California’s beautiful native plants.

Check out the Wikipedia entry on Cloisonné to learn more.

Bookbinding, Metalsmithing and Glass
We have the tools and supplies you need for your projects and classes
www.volcanoarts.com

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)

~590 to 600 – Cathac of St. Columba – oldest surviving manuscript in Ireland. 58 folios, damaged and incomplete. Vellum. Black ink.

Read more on Wikipedia 

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

 

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Bookbinding, Metalsmithing and Glass
We have the tools and supplies you need for your projects and classes
www.volcanoarts.com

 

rabula gospels

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)

586 – Earliest dated illuminated manuscript – Rabbula Gospels (Beth Zagba, Syria)

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

Sponsored by2016vaexclamation300

Bookbinding, Metalsmithing and Glass
We have the tools and supplies you need for your projects and classes
www.volcanoarts.com

Spraying Polyurethane

I’ve been using spray paint for years, but I’ve avoided polyurethane sealant spray. It’s a whole ‘nother beast and I could never quite get it laid down right. It’s thicker than spray paint so my efforts tended to look spotted or to have drips. Unacceptable!

I recently spent 2 days practicing on small pieces of metal, and, sisters and brothers in art, I’ve done it! I now feel very good about my polyurethane spraying abilities.

Notes from the field:

  • Use a raking light so that you can watch the polyurethane land on the piece. You’ll be able to see the wetness of the spray as you apply it, allowing you to spot fix anything missed. Watching the spray hit the piece will also help you judge the correct distance and speed.
  • Ignore that 12″ to 14″ instruction on the can. For the small pieces I just finished, spraying from 8″ was about right.
  • To get rid of dust, use a can of pressurized air on the piece right before spraying the polyurethane.
  • The room needs to be 70 to 90 degrees (and well-ventilated). This helps the polyurethane self-level. I rigged up a little heat lamp over my spray station.
  • Wearing an OptiVisor is a necessity when spraying small pieces. Tiny surfaces mean no room for errors.

Happy spraying!

By Christine Cox

Sponsored by:

Bookbinding, Metalsmithing and Glass
We have the tools and supplies you need for your projects and classes
www.volcanoarts.com

Alice Comes To Life in Books

exploringalice

In August, bookbinder Fran Kovac taught a class at the Morgan Art of Papermaking Conservatory & Educational Foundation in Cleveland, OH (www.morganconservatory.org).

The class focused on various decorative techniques, such as framing, attachments and foundation molding, and worked with leather, paper and book cloth, as well as various charms and illustrations suitable for Alice in Wonderland.   The text blocks were made using books-in-sheets from Volcano Arts. The students added illustrations throughout the text before sewing, and the books were sewn with the French Link stitch on parchment straps.

Each student took home their own bound and decorated copy of Alice in Wonderland.”

The students were Edith Briskin, Michele Cotner, Margo Libman, and Amy Fishbach.

Beautiful work, ladies! Thank you, Fran!

Post by Fran Kovac and Christine Cox
Sponsored by Volcano Arts

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