Christine Cox

Archive for February, 2016

Metalsmith: Filing in Tight Places

barrettefilebarrette

Metalsmith
(A typically occasional series by Christine Cox)

For filing in tight places where adjoining areas could be damaged, use a barrette file. Only one side has teeth and the other edges slope away from them. They come in several sizes and every coarseness you could need. They are even included in most needle file and mini-needle file sets.

Needle and mini-needle file sets are available from Volcano Arts
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4th Century: Bamboo Slips to Paper in China

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)

By the 4th c – Paper has replaced bamboo and wooden slips as writing support in China

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

Metalsmith: Sweating Solder onto Findings

Metalsmith
(A typically occasional series by Christine Cox)

Sweating solder onto findings: Dig little holes into your charcoal block and then bury tiny findings (butt-side up) into the holes. This protects the little dears while melting the solder.pinbackscharcoalblock

4th Century: First Signed Illuminations

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)

Year 354—First illumination work with known artist name: Roman calendar now called Chronography of 354 — Furius Dionysius Filocalus wrote the titles.

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

 

4th Century: Latin Vulgate Translation

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)


Malmesbury Bible

382 to 404 – Latin Vulgate Christian Bible translation (from Greek to Latin) commissioned by Pope Damasus I (both testaments). Translated and written by Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus (St. Jerome). Written in Uncial script. (This version was used for over 1,000 years and was the Bible of the Dark Ages)

There’s an excellent article on the Latin Vulgate in Wikipedia

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

(photo by Adrian Pingstone) Licensed under Public Domain via Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bible.malmesbury.arp.jpg#/media/File:Bible.malmesbury.arp.jpg

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