Christine Cox

Books, Miniatures, Writing and Supports
(Timeline Project)


Malmesbury Bible

382 to 404 – Latin Vulgate Christian Bible translation (from Greek to Latin) commissioned by Pope Damasus I (both testaments). Translated and written by Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus (St. Jerome). Written in Uncial script. (This version was used for over 1,000 years and was the Bible of the Dark Ages)

There’s an excellent article on the Latin Vulgate in Wikipedia

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

(photo by Adrian Pingstone) Licensed under Public Domain via Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bible.malmesbury.arp.jpg#/media/File:Bible.malmesbury.arp.jpg

graphitesoldering

Bench Hack
(A typically occasional metalsmithing series by Christine Cox)

When soldering a pin back onto a brooch, use a piece of graphite (you know, for mechanical pencils) to ensure that catch and joint are lined up. The graphite will take the heat of your torch while your pin back stays straight.

Bird brooch available in my Etsy store

leatheronapron

Bench Hack
(A typically occasional metalsmithing series by Christine Cox)

While stringing a saw frame most people use their sternum to compress the frame while tightening. This can be dangerous and painful if you have bird bones like mine. Staple a piece of leather to your shop apron and you’ll have some protection.

 

boundbird

Bench Hack
(A typically occasional metalsmithing series by Christine Cox)

If your shape doesn’t lend itself to being wired for soldering, like this bird brooch, cut notches in the base-plate. They will be sawed off later with the rest of the excess metal. There are 4 teeny tiny notches around the profile of the bird in this picture.

Bird brooch for available in my Etsy store

2015 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys (their term) prepared a 2015 annual report for my blog. It doesn’t prove anything (other than that I should post more often), but it’s fun. Happy New Year, everyone!

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 6,900 times in 2015. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 6 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Books, Miniatures, Paper and Writing Timeline Project
4th Century: Making Paper in Korea

The secrets of papermaking are moving along the Silk Road from China and into Korea, where the paper is now called Hanji.

From Wikipedia:

Hangul 한지
Hanja 韓紙
Revised Romanization hanji
McCune–Reischauer hanji

Wikipedia has an excellent article on the history of Korean papermaking.

This post is part of an ongoing series on books, miniatures, writing and supports since the year 1. Please consider it a kick-start for your own private timeline and a springboard for further research. See my blog for the rest of the series.

Here is a good post on The Sewing Frame blog showing pictures of sewing the Italian Renaissance headband. It looks like she might be using an old paperback book to practice on. That’s a great idea!

Source: The Italian Renaissance headband

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